Showing posts sorted by relevance for query pam/principles. Sort by date Show all posts
Showing posts sorted by relevance for query pam/principles. Sort by date Show all posts

Sunday, July 7, 2013

Incidental learning

"Learning is often incidental. This means that we learn while engaged in activities that we enjoy for their own sakes and the learning happens as a sort of 'side benefit'."
—Pam Sorooshian
medieval-style art in a tube station
SandraDodd.com/pam/principles
photo by Sandra Dodd, of medieval art on tile in a tube station in London

Friday, July 26, 2013

Some kind of learning

an ice cream truck in Liverpool, ferris wheel in the background"Learning happens all the time. The brain never stops working and it is not possible to divide time up into 'learning periods' versus 'non-learning periods.' Everything that goes on around a person, everything they hear, see, touch, smell, and taste, results in learning of some kind."
—Pam Sorooshian
SandraDodd.com/pam/principles
photo by Sandra Dodd

Tuesday, August 20, 2013

Living proof

"We don't have to be tested to find out what we've learned. The learning will be demonstrated as we use new skills and talk knowledgeably about a topic."
—Pam Sorooshian
SandraDodd.com/pam/principles
photo by Sandra Dodd

Saturday, December 8, 2018

Living proof

"We don't have to be tested to find out what we've learned. The learning will be demonstrated as we use new skills and talk knowledgeably about a topic."
—Pam Sorooshian
SandraDodd.com/pam/principles
photo by Sandra Dodd

Tuesday, November 12, 2013

Emotions and intellect

spiral slide with boy"Feelings and intellect are not in opposition and not even separate things. All learning involves the emotions, as well as the intellect."
—Pam Sorooshian
SandraDodd.com/pam/principles
photo by Sarah Dickinson

Monday, May 31, 2021

Swirling and wonderful

Pam Sorooshian described what she called "a very basic tenet of unschooling":

Surround the child with a swirling, wonderful, exciting, stimulating and rich environment and the child is naturally capable of learning from it.
—Pam Sorooshian
The quote is from my page on "Talking to Babies," but a better next read is the list of Principles of Unschooling by Pam Sorooshian
photo by Sandra Dodd, of unschooled siblings in Queensland

Thursday, December 16, 2021

Learning feels good.

Learning feels good. It is satisfying and intrinsically rewarding. Irrelevant rewards can have unintended side effects that do not support learning.

Principles of Unschooling, by Pam Sorooshian
photo by Dan Vilter (who originally preserved Pam's writing)

Friday, January 31, 2020

Your own clear understanding

Pam Sorooshian wrote:

Unschooling happily and successfully requires clear thinking. I don't think it works as well when people just look at those with young adult kids who are happy and successful
and try to copy them without doing the hard thinking and building their own clear understanding of unschooling. When they try to emulate, they are still following rules - unschooling rules. Unschoolers always say yes to everything. Unschoolers never make their kids do anything. Kids always decide everything for themselves. And so on. But those "rules" are not unschooling. Unschooling well requires understanding the underlying philosophy of how children learn, and the principles that guide us in our everyday lives arise from that philosophy. It isn't some new kind of parenting technique that can be observed and applied without understanding.
—Pam Sorooshian

SandraDodd.com/understanding
photo by Belinda Dutch

Monday, November 12, 2018

Happily and successfully

Pam Sorooshian wrote:

Unschooling happily and successfully requires clear thinking.
. . . .
Unschooling well requires understanding the underlying philosophy of how children learn, and the principles that guide us in our everyday lives arise from that philosophy. It isn't some new kind of parenting technique that can be observed and applied without understanding.
—Pam Sorooshian
SandraDodd.com/understanding
photo by Janine Davies

Saturday, October 6, 2012

Understanding

Today's quote isn't simple. I threw in some italics and bold-face myself to help you read it. You can see it in a larger context, at the link below. —Sandra

Pam Sorooshian wrote:

"Unschooling happily and successfully requires clear thinking. I don't think it works as well when people just look at those with young adult kids who are happy and successful and try to copy them without doing the hard thinking and building their own clear understanding of unschooling. When they try to emulate, they are still following rules—unschooling rules. Unschoolers always say yes to everything. Unschoolers never make their kids do anything. Kids always decide everything for themselves. And so on. But those "rules" are not unschooling. Unschooling well requires understanding the underlying philosophy of how children learn, and the principles that guide us in our everyday lives arise from that philosophy. It isn't some new kind of parenting technique that can be observed and applied without understanding."

—Pam Sorooshian

SandraDodd.com/understanding
photo by Sandra Dodd

Tuesday, April 26, 2016

The path ahead

When the path is clear and easy, relax and enjoy the peace.

When you come to obstacles or there's more than one path, you'll be rested and prepared to choose based on what you know and what seems to lead you nearer to safety and growth.
SandraDodd.com/principles
photo by Pam Laricchia

Friday, January 25, 2019

Meaningful learning

Learning must be meaningful. When a person doesn't see the point, when they don't know how the information relates or is useful in "the real world," then the learning is superficial and temporary - not "real" learning.
—Pam Sorooshian
Principles of Unschooling
photo by Sandra Dodd
(of booted feet of Holly D. and Heather B.)

Thursday, June 15, 2017

Incidentally...

"Learning is often incidental. This means that we learn while engaged in activities that we enjoy for their own sakes and the learning happens as a sort of 'side benefit'."
—Pam Sorooshian
Principles of Unschooling
photo by Chrissy Florence