Showing posts sorted by relevance for query /trust. Sort by date Show all posts
Showing posts sorted by relevance for query /trust. Sort by date Show all posts

Monday, October 16, 2017

Trust can grow

"There are many things one can trust as one begins unschooling. Draw on what you know about your child, your partner and yourself to nurture confidence. Trust in unschooling will deepen and grow as one gains understanding and experience. Oh! Which reminds me! I trusted that others who had unschooled their children successfully before me knew some things (a lot of things, it turned out) that could help me. That trust grew as I tried some of the things people suggested and they proved to be very useful."
SandraDodd.com/karenjames/trust
photo by Rippy Dusseldorp

Sunday, July 28, 2013

Trust

Joanne Murphy wrote:

Just yesterday a friend and I were discussing what we thought of as a distilling 'factor' that must be present for unschooling/mindful parenting to be successful. The factor that came up was TRUST.

7/28/13 photo of our cat Nuee, Holly hiding behind, Holly photo
With trust, the world opens up, horizons expand and life can seem exciting and limitless. Without trust, the world shuts down, gets narrow and petty. Each moment matters in the wrong way. I want more expansiveness in my life, not less."
—Joanna Murphy


SandraDodd.com/trust
photo by Holly Dodd

Sunday, December 13, 2020

A little trust, one step

Someone had written, of unschooling:

"It sounds like it takes an enormous amount of trust in everything to allow this process to happen."


I responded:

"It takes a little trust, and desire, and willingness, to take one step. It gets easier as you go. No one can take all of the steps at once."
No one can, or should, have trust in everything. Try things out. Think carefully, and observe directly. Practice!
Read a little, try a little, wait a while, watch.
photo by Sarah Dickinson

Wednesday, June 28, 2017

Trust learning

"Don’t trust children to be right. Trust children to be able to make a guess and then learn from what happens."
—Joyce Fetteroll
SandraDodd.com/trust
photo by Megan Valnes

Saturday, July 23, 2011

Listen, learn and trust

Joyce Fetteroll wrote:
*Listen* to what she says with an open mind. Don't listen with an ear tuned to your ideas of what she should be thinking or should not be thinking. Listen to *her* ideas. Don't impose your "right" way of thinking on her. Don't lead her to your "right" way of viewing the world. Listen to her growing understanding. Trust that she's a thinking being and her ideas will change as she gains experience with the world. Trust she'll value kindness if who she is is treated with respect and kindness. Trust that she'll want to step on your ideas if you show her that's what you do with people who don't have the same ideas as you do.
—Joyce Fetteroll

Joyce wrote that on the Always Learning discussion list on July 22, 2010.
photo by Sandra Dodd

Monday, August 16, 2021

Understanding and experience

"There are many things one can trust as one begins unschooling. Draw on what you know about your child, your partner and yourself to nurture confidence. Trust in unschooling will deepen and grow as one gains understanding and experience."
—Karen James
Trust
photo by Gail Higgins

Monday, April 13, 2020

Honest, attentive and reliable

Quote & reply quote:

Trust is a more useful word. Over time, kids develop a sense of whether or not parents are trustworthy sources of information and assistance."
—Meredith Meredith

"Good point. And very often, parents 'demand respect' without any idea that they need to earn it. For a child to trust a parent, the parent needs to be worthy of trust—trustworthy. Trustable. Then after many years of being honest and attentive and reliable, the children will respect them. Because they're respectable."
—Sandra Dodd

The originals are here, a few comments down, in a brief, good discussion on facebook. De Flowers saved and shared the part above in 2014.
photo by Tessa Onderwater

Saturday, August 3, 2019

Earn your children's trust

Live your life in such a way that other people will trust you. When you make decisions, make generous, selfless decisions so that others benefit. When you say something, do your best to say what is fair and right and true. When you write, write things you don't mind people taking out and sharing.

A person is only trustworthy if he has earned trust, if he is worthy of being trusted.

BENEFITS beyond just "be a better parent"
photo by Marty Dodd

Saturday, February 10, 2018

Trust; it's true

Caren Knox wrote:

Trust is a vital foundation to building an unschooling home. If kids can't trust that what their parents are saying is true, their foundation is shaky, perilous.
That affects their ability to learn, and harms the relationship they have with the world (and their parents).

Why bring a negative force into the home?

If you're used to sarcasm and other lying, it might take practice to learn to speak honestly. It can feel vulnerable and risky. It is worth it. You'll soon be able to feel if what you are about to say is true — really true — and you'll develop the ability to stop, breathe, and change what you're saying if needed.
—Caren Knox
Deposit the good stuff.
photo by Cathy Koetsier

Sunday, April 30, 2017

Trust and respect

Trust and respect go together. Someone who is trustworthy will be respected.
SandraDodd.com/trust
photo by Julie D.

Wednesday, June 1, 2016

Swirl

"You can read all the books, you can talk to unschoolers, attend a conference and join some lists. But until you GET IT at the internal level, until there is trust and a willingness to extend that trust to your children, unschooling is just a nice idea or philosophy to discuss...nothing more. For those that decide to learn to trust themselves and their children, they soon find their lives a bubbly, interesting swirl of natural learning."
—Ren Allen
SandraDodd.com/gettingit
photo by Hinano

Saturday, May 2, 2015

Trust and faith

Trust and faith are the most powerful tools parents of teens have. Too many parents squander those trying to control toddlers and young children.
SandraDodd.com/trust
photo by Sandra Dodd

Saturday, August 9, 2014

Become trustworthy

Parents, in order to have their children trust them, should become trustworthy.
. . . .
Trust and respect go together. Someone who is trustworthy will be respected.
two very different chickens and three kinds of hollyhocks
SandraDodd.com/trust
photo by Lisa Jonick

Saturday, March 2, 2013

The deepest trust

Make a mental note of those times when you know in your soul that this is really working well. Those mental notes help you gain understanding, confidence,

and ultimately build trust in the process of unschooling, and in your children. The deepest trust happens when you see it in action for yourself, when your understanding meshes with your experiences.

—Pam Laricchia
Free to Live
page 93, ebook version


SandraDodd.com/hsc/interviews/paml
photo by Sandra Dodd, of stairs, steps, and shadows
>

Thursday, September 20, 2012

Building trust

"Make a mental note of those times when you know in your soul that this is really working well. That act helps you gain understanding, confidence, and ultimately build trust in the process of unschooling, and in your children. The deepest trust happens when you see it in action for yourself, when your understanding meshes with your experiences—that's when you 'feel it in your bones'."
The quote is from the manuscript of Pam Laricchia's forthcoming book, Free to Live, which should be available by the beginning of 2013,
and is used with the author's permission.
photo by Sandra Dodd
2020 update: That was Pam's second book and there are others now, too!
Pam Laricchia's Books

Monday, August 13, 2012

A bubbly, interesting swirl

Ren Allen wrote:

You can attend a thousand Zen classes at a University and still not understand it because it is something that is internal. You can have a bunch of nice meditation products and still be angry. You can make a big deal out of living simply and still miss all the beauty around you.

It's not about the accoutrements but the "seeing with new eyes."

Sorta like unschooling.

You can read all the books, you can talk to unschoolers, attend a conference and join some lists. But until you GET IT at the internal level, until there is trust and a willingness to extend that trust to your children, unschooling is just a nice idea or philosophy to discuss...nothing more. For those that decide to learn to trust themselves and their children, they soon find their lives a bubbly, interesting swirl of natural learning.

—Ren Allen

SandraDodd.com/gettingit
photo by Sandra Dodd; candid shot of cool things
in Ericka Mahowald's room in Northborough, Massachusetts

Friday, May 7, 2021

Sharing intangibles

old English door with wreath
Abundance in one person provides benefits for others. A child with all the trust he needs can trust others. A child with all the time he needs can share that time with others. One who has freedom won't begrudge freedom in others.
How to Raise a Respected Child
photo by Kelly Drewery

Sunday, May 10, 2020

One more?

This is about love, and abundance, and trust-building. What would you pay, if you could buy love, abundance and trust?

If your kids ask for another one (potato, cookie, peanut butter sandwich) I think it's helpful if you just say "Sure!" and make another one, even if you don't think they'll finish it, even if you think they'll be too full or whatever. As long as they're not eating someone else's share (and even so, if the other person agrees), it's not a big deal. If they don't finish, save the leftover for someone else. If they do finish and they're "too full" that's how they'll learn their capacity (which will change anyway as they get older).

Moving Toward Less Control, Concerning Food
photo by Rachel Cooley Green

Sunday, November 17, 2019

Building the foundation

Caren Knox wrote:

In addition to this time being short, and precious, you are building the foundation of natural learning in your home. Learning flows when needs are met, connections are strong, and kids can absolutely trust their parents, and know their parents are there for them. Some of the core values of natural learning are trust, support, joy, and freedom. You are putting up scaffolding for years and years of learning by the choices you make now.

—Caren Knox

"Are we stuck?"
photo by Gail Higgins

Saturday, October 5, 2019

Relationship, trust and peace

The relationship, the trust, and peace, are what will help learning work.

Relationships and wholeness
photo by Gail Higgins